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Dear Cynthia: I’m Not Sure How to Buy the Right Gift

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Op/Ed By Cynthia Blake –

 

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Dear Cynthia:

One of my co-workers is having a birthday party soon, and I’ve been invited to attend. However, the problem is that I don’t know her that well, so I have no idea what to get her for her birthday. Please let me know if you have any ideas, or whether you think I should make an excuse so I don’t have to attend. Thanks in advance for your advice!

Signed,

I’m Not Sure How to Buy the Right Gift

Dear Not Sure:

If you see your co-worker before the party, it can be helpful to make small talk with that person. I’ve noticed that people enjoy talking about themselves, so try engaging your co-worker with “soft” questions, such as: What are your favorite foods? What are some of the activities you like to do for fun? Do they enjoy reading, or journal-writing? While you are talking, glance around your co-worker’s work space for any personal items that may be displayed there. Your co-worker’s work space may contain clues about the things he or she likes. I believe we should make every effort to attend a co-worker’s birthday party. In my experience, team participation in the workplace should always be encouraged.

Dear Cynthia:

I just moved into a new office, and all of my things are still in boxes after a few weeks. I feel like I’m having trouble getting re-organized. Where do you think I should start first? Thanks in advance for your help!

Recently Moved and Unorganized

Dear Recently Moved and Unorganized:

Since a few weeks have passed, and all of your things are still in boxes, your task should be pretty easy going forward.

If you have been continuing to operate efficiently for the past few weeks without the contents of those boxes; it is obvious that you may no longer need the majority of the items that may have been useful to you in your daily operations at one time.

Here are four things you can do, in order to get organized: 1) Take one “large” box, and empty its contents. 2) Proceed to the next box, and empty the contents you no longer need into the large empty box. 3) Repeat step 2 with the contents of each box.

Finally, take the full “large” box, and set it and its contents aside as a “charitable gift” for an organization that needs it.

Dear Cynthia:

Each time I have a disagreement with my significant other, I feel like he simply talks over me, instead of listening to what I am saying. We get along great in all other areas of our relationship, however, if we have different points of view, it seems like he would rather be the one who is right, instead of compromising, or listening to my point of view. Please help me figure out how to have more healthy disagreements with my partner, in a way that we can both feel our voices are being heard.

Thank you in advance for your advice,

Feeling Frustrated and Unheard

Dear Frustrated and Unheard:

I feel that, in every relationship, we should always ask ourselves the question: Do I want to be happy, or do I have to be right? I think that, when we concentrate on personal happiness, we will be more concerned with finding a resolution. No one can speak and listen at the same time. We have to do one or the other. If we wait, and stop talking, we will know when it is our turn to speak. It’s all about respect for ourselves, and respect for others.

Dear Cynthia:

I’m worried about my school-aged kids, who rarely go outside to play lately. It seems like all they do is play video games, or text on their cell phones. This concerns me because I think one of my sons is becoming overweight, which may be unhealthy. How can I get my kids to focus on playing outdoors more, instead of on the technology that’s making them lazy? Please help!

Signed,

A Concerned Parent

Dear Concerned Parent:

I believe, as parents, our lifestyle choices are being indelibly imprinted in the minds of our children. I also believe that children mimic the examples that are set by the adults in their environments. There is a good chance that most parents are spending a lot of time with technology – and their children are watching them. If we’d like to encourage more outdoor playing time for our children, it may be a good idea to play with them, in activities like bouncing a ball with them, catching a ball with them, or bicycling alongside of them. Maybe the concerns we have for our kids should be the same concerns we have for ourselves. I believe that by engaging in outdoor activities with our children, everyone can experience a healthier lifestyle by making healthier choices.

Dear Cynthia:

I work with a group of six women, and they have been leaving me out of a group lunch that seems to be by “memo invitation” within the office.

I have only been invited to one lunch, which was a verbal ask by one of the group members who thought I was invited, such as “Are you coming?”

This seems to be unfair, because our company tasks are discussed during those lunches. When our group is called into meetings, everyone else has updates that I don’t have, and I look like I am not on the same page.

What should I do?

Sincerely,
Didn’t Get the Lunch Memo

Dear Didn’t Get the Lunch Memo:

When you are invited to the next group lunch, it should be acceptable to ask how members are informed of the upcoming lunches. Hopefully, at that point, you will be given the updates that everyone else has. Then, going forward, you will be on the same page as everyone else. Remember, the only bad questions are the ones we do not ask. When we ask and receive clarity, we have a resolve.

Dear Cynthia:

I am having trouble finding balance between a busy schedule and a happy life. After all the daily tasks and regular stress of the day-to-day, I find myself exhausted most days, and unable to find a moment of peace. My responsibilities and tasks aren’t going anywhere, so how do I find a way to enjoy more of my life?

Signed Busy and Unhappy

Dear Busy and Unhappy:

It’s important for us to leave home at home when we leave home, and to leave work at work when we leave work. One of the ways to reduce stress from our day-to-day chores and responsibilities is to find an hour in the evening to sit and relax. What that hour can do is bring you some peaceable moments, and balance. Spending that hour being thankful and counting your blessings may result in your enjoyment.

Dear Cynthia:

I think I have developed a fear of traveling. I used to be much more adventurous. But now, it seems as if every time you turn around, all you hear about are more terrorist attacks, either at home or abroad. I’ve always wanted to travel outside the country, but now I’m not so sure it’s a good idea. What do you think I should do? Do you think I should remain cautious, and not take the risk? Or do you think I should throw caution to the wind, and see the world?

Thanks for your response.

Afraid to Travel Outside the US

Dear Afraid:

Have you heard that you only live once? The former President Franklin D. Roosevelt said, and I quote, “There’s nothing to fear, but fear itself.” Are you familiar with the acronym F.E.A.R. (False Evidence Appearing Real)? How about this one, “If you don’t risk anything, you’re not truly living.” So, with heartfelt concern, I’d like to say to you, “It is better to live a life full of hope, than to live in fear.”

Dear Cynthia:

My dad never calls me. I try to call him several times per year, and go visit him at least once per year, but every time I visit, by the time I leave, his wife (the new, younger one)-my step mom, changes the phone number. Should I keep calling him, and trying to maintain a relationship? I’m 40 years old and this has been going on for the past 20+ years.

Perplexed

Dear Perplexed:

Out of respect for your dad and your stepmother, I would wait, and give them an opportunity to call you. Since this has been going on for the past 20 years, there’s no reason to be perplexed. If they are unwilling to contact you, there’s nothing you can do about it.

Disclaimer: The advice offered in this column is intended for informational purposes only. Use of this column is not intended to replace or substitute for any professional, financial, medical, legal, or other professional advice. If you have specific concerns or a situation in which you require professional, psychological or medical help, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified specialist.

Editor’s Note: One of the Minority Reporter’s newest staff members, with a knack for giving great advice, will be offering her response to any reader questions, inquiries, or troubles in her new “Dear Cynthia” column, which will be published regularly in the Minority Reporter. With an honest and open approach, upheld by a wealth of life experiences, she’s here to lend a listening ear to any reader dilemmas, problems, or difficulties our readers may face, and share the life lessons she’s learned from facing her own life challenges.

We value Cynthia’s opinion at the Minority Reporter, and, once you get to know her, we’re sure you will too! Please welcome Cynthia, as we continue to share her new responses, above!    

Send us your question for Cynthia (use the form below)… or your can email her at cynthiablake@minorityreporter.net.