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Tuesday 20 November 2018
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How, after 60 Years, Brown v. Board of Education has kept schools segregated

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Op/Ed by Howard Eagle

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Howard Eagle howard.eagle90@gmail.com
After the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, as the country, and specifically public schools, pretended to supposedly integrate, thousands of historic, all-black, public schools were broken up, especially in the South. In addition, thousands upon thousands of black educators (many of whom consciously attempted to literally reproduce themselves via constantly encouraging, urging, and prodding their students) lost their jobs.

Huge numbers of those educators were replaced by, in most cases, socially, economically, politically, and culturally disconnected white educators; many of whom already lived in the suburbs, or moved there shortly after the so-called integration started.

As a result, this left urban school districts, in particular, with high percentages of black students, but less-diverse faculties and staff; while, at the same time, the suburban schools remained virtually all-white.

In my opinion, it is very important for African Americans to clearly understand that efforts by Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund, via the 60-year-old Brown case, were fundamentally flawed. Additionally, I think it’s important for people to realize that, objectively, public school “integration” represents one of the biggest, cruelest, systemic political and cultural tricks that have been played on us since the start of the 20th Century.

Ultimately, this resulted in the establishment of a new, sophisticated form of Jim Crow education, in which the overwhelming majority of white children attended suburban, public, and/or private schools, and the overwhelming majority, in many cases, of the instructors were just like the children. They seemed to have the same racial, social, economic, political and cultural backgrounds.

On the other hand, the overwhelming majority of black children seemed to attend decrepit, urban, public schools, in which the overwhelming majority of the students were also alike racially, socially, economically, politically, and culturally. Consequently, for all practical intents and purposes, the majority of those who were instructing them might as well have been aliens. That is, the two latter groups have probably been as different socially, economically, politically, and culturally as day is from night.

Therefore, it is important for us to continue paying close attention to this phenomenon. One reason it is important is because many liberals, and super-liberals, are again pushing for public school “integration” via the development of so-called “metropolitan school districts,” which is fine, if they’d like.

I mean, if they are really convinced of the validity and value of developing so-called metropolitan school districts, then it is incumbent upon them to convince their cousins, uncles, aunts, friends, mothers, fathers, brothers, and sisters to support their beliefs. After all, historically, it has not been black folks who have resisted the so-called “integration” of public schools.

On the contrary, I think we would have to look far and wide to find a group of people anywhere in the world who have attempted to integrate with white people more than black people.

And, as it relates to the clear, historical record concerning past, strategic mistakes, and systemic trickery, it is my hope and prayer that, today; African Americans (as opposed to chasing pipe dreams) will become organized like never before. I also hope that, in order to effectively help improve the schools where they currently stand, “minorities” will develop their own, controlled, educational models; just as others have always done, and are continuing to do.